Kintore Way Children's Centre

History

The First 60 Years

Kintore Way Nursery School took its first children in January 1939, although the formal opening was not until 1st March that year. Kintore Way was one of a handful of nursery schools built before the war. It was one of the largest with a capacity for 90 children, some of whom were as young as two.

The Evacuation

On the morning of 1st September, two days before the official outbreak of war, 65 children together with teachers and parent helpers were bundled into double decker buses which set off for an unknown destination. Parents were not obliged to send their children away, although just over half of the Kintore Way families chose to do so. After several hours on the road, the school party arrived at Ford Manor in Surrey. For the 15 months until December 1940, the children and the staff shared the house with its owner, Mrs Spender Clay, and her staff. The school then moved to Reid Hall in Surrey and later to Rusholme at Crockhall Hill in Kent. The threat of German rockets, known as Doodlebugs, caused another move in 1944 to Pembury Grove in Buckinghamshire. Back in London, the buildings of Kintore Way were used first as a fire station and then as a day nursery. Many of the surrounding streets suffered heavy bomb damage but Kintore Way escaped harm.

After the War

The school re-opened in April 1946 under headteacher Miss Barbara Furneaux. In those days the school was open between 8.30am and 5.30pm. Breakfast (at a cost of 3d) and tea (at a cost of 2d) were served to the children. Food rationing was still in force but the menu contained as much protein as possible. Each child had two thirds of a pint of milk and a daily dose of cod liver oil. About 90 children now attended, some of them as young as one year old.

By 1963 breakfast and tea were no longer served and part-time education had just been introduced. The day was gradually shortened and the holidays were extended until they were the same as primary schools. It was felt that two year olds were too young to be in school and the admission age was raised to three.

The school was extended in 1972 by the addition of a fourth classroom. This brought the number of places up to 120 full time equivalent.

Development as a Children’s Centre

Following major refurbishment and new building, in October 2006 the school became a children’s centre, linking with other local projects to provide a wide range of services to children and families. Kintore Way Nursery School took its first children in January 1939, although the formal opening was not until 1st March that year. Kintore Way was one of a handful of nursery schools built before the war. It was one of the largest with a capacity for 90 children, some of whom were as young as two.